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20121224
20130101
STATION
KRCB (PBS) 14
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English 14
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
PBS
Dec 29, 2012 11:30am PST
technologies foundation is proud to support to the contrary on pbs our foundation seeks to advance science education and further society's understanding of the life sciences including the impact of gee ownmics on the practice of medicine. >> and by sam's club. committed to small business and the spirit of the entrepreneur. and proud to support pbs's to the contrary with bonnie erbe. additional funding provided by... this week on a special edition of to the contrary, we take an indepth look at dna sequencing and how it's helping children with rare dna sequencing and how it's helping children with rare diseases. [♪] >> hello i'm bonnie erbe welcome to to the contrary a discussion of news and social trends from diverse perspectives. this week we show you how advances in dna sequencing are helping scientists find cures for rare diseases especially rare childhood diseases. dr. james lupski is a man with a mission as a pediatrician at baylor college of medicine in houston, dr. lupski has devoted much of his medical career to researching and treating children with rare diseases. >> the patients
PBS
Dec 24, 2012 5:00pm PST
of social sciences released its assessment of the international situation in a report on monday. referring to the budget in japan, they reported china-japan is in the worst state. it adds that tensions could be eased through diplomatic channels. china has repeatedly sent ships into japanese waters around the senkaku, apparently to jeopardize japan and to recognize that opposition exists. china says japan's stubborn position could push it further. china-japan relations, as well as northeast asia's security instability will face difficult challenges. analysts said the report is thought to be aimed at thwarting further moves of the president to be inaugerated this week. >>> park began picking her team of aides and adviser lawmaker yohuhu is her chief of staff. the 67-year-old yu is an ally of pug. he is known as an expert in economic policy. >> clie chinese leaders are wary of the incoming government. >>> park began picking her team of aides and advisers. lawmaker yohuhu is her chief of staff. the 67-year-old yu is an ally of park. he is known as an expert in economic policy. park says pug wi
PBS
Dec 27, 2012 5:30pm PST
. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> warner: five days and counting with plenty of tit-for- tat charges, but no agreement in sight. that, in short, summed up the state of affairs in washington today as the fiscal cliff deadline loomed, january first. it would mean more than $600 billion in across-the-board tax increases and automatic spending cuts. >> come the first of this year, americans will have less income than they have today. if we go over the cliff, and it looks like that's where we're headed. >> warner: this morning, the senate's democratic majority leader, harry reid, was blunt about chances for a deal. and he blamed house speaker john boehner. just before christmas, boehner floated his so-called "plan b"-- letting taxes rise on millionaires. but faced
PBS
Dec 24, 2012 5:30pm PST
. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and fincial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: gunfire tore at the nation's holiday mood again today, with the emotional wounds from a school massacre still fresh. there were more fatal shootings, including one in western new york, where an attacker lay in wait for a fire crew. >> responding firefighters when they pulled up on the scene started receiving -- were fired upon. >> police speaking shortly after a home and car erupted in flames. it was arson they said later that turned out to be an ambush. >> it does appear that it was a trap that was set. for responding frst responrs. >> gunmen killed two volunteer firefighters and wounded two others then killed himself. police identified him as william spangler, he haddon time, 17 years for manslaughter but ha motive for today'
PBS
Dec 26, 2012 5:30pm PST
look at a science story that captured headlines this year. the federal government has taken new steps to limit some of the research it does with chimpanzees, which have long been the source of hope and debate. but questions remain about whether those experiments should occur under any circumstances. "newshour" science correspondent miles o'brien reports. >> reporter: there are no other animals quite like them, except us. they share 99% of our d.n.a. and it shows. they scheme, plot and fight. they care for their babies and they grieve their dead. and they love a good game of catch. as i discovered, queenie had little patience for my wild pitches. >> did you see her stomp her foot? >> reporter: she's very mad at me. those very similarities are at the core of a heated debate over whether scientists should keep using chimpanzees for scientific and medical research. do we owe our cousins something more? here, they say we do. welcome to chimp haven, near shreveport louisiana, a 200-acre oasis of tall trees and hidden daily treats for about 130 chimpanzees. haven co-founder amy fultz put me
PBS
Dec 24, 2012 4:30pm PST
no it's really a science business. core labs, about a $5 billion company and they specialize in helping oil companies find more oil and more gas that benefits all around the world. so they have scientists who actually take samples of rock and water, analyze that and try to help oil companies find more oil that may be hidden or tucked away so we can abscess more oil, which good for all o us. >> t: we're talking about an energy boon in the united states, energy prices, that's helped keep a cap on energy prices here. what kind of holding time frame do you anticipate to make some money? >> as we've seen this year, one reason why core labs is attractive from a valuation perfect suspective we've seen the stock soften this year as some of the rig counts have softened as well because of the i prices of natural gas have really fallen. and i do think this will reverse sometime over the next few years and we'll see more rigs be put to use, an that's good for core labs, but to do that you really need to take that three-year time horizon. >> tom: luk, often called a mini berkshire hathaway, beef pa
PBS
Dec 25, 2012 4:30pm PST
sciences, engineering and art that has given birth to perhaps more game makers and changers than any other place in the real world and was the home of -- >> find the best in everybody. >> mike: professor randy palm whose last lecture became phenomen. it was a viral inspiration to millions but he was an inspiration to the smiths long before that. >> from the beginning of us starting this company he said "you guys really have something here. you have something unique. and keep developing that. keep making a-- make the best company you can possibly make and shoot for the stars." >> mike: shooting for the stars. they can do that. >> it will take you a long time to design a square head on this guy. >> yeah. >> mike: it's no secret that the new media-- both the internet and digital devices-- has taken a large bite out of the newspaper and magazine businesses. but there are some notable exceptions. we'll take you now to one company that is determined not to let the sun set on old media. it is doing more than just scratching for chicken feed in the media barnyard. it is planting the seeds of new b
PBS
Dec 30, 2012 9:00am PST
in the movie with basic science raises a point that mark describes it that the synoptic gos members, matthew, mark, luke and john, do not suggest the basis for the extreme, the savagery that we see in the motion picture, correct? >> not at all. you can really only find one lines in the gospels about jesus being lashed and whipped. and all that scourging that we see in the film and that takes about 45 minutes in the movie. >> spell that out a little bit. in matthew there is mention of being scourged before taken to the hill, that is the auous process to get there, he was crowned with thorns, he was spit upon or smote or hit on the head. >> we certainly don't get a sense of the violence that attends the trial and the execution of jesus. we don't get that in the gospels at all. >> there's no mention -- let me clarify, there's no mention of scourging in john. and that brings us to another interesting question that we can raise with you and we're joined on the live line and he's actually been listeni to us and he may choose to comment on what you've said thus far david brickner who is the executi
PBS
Dec 27, 2012 9:00pm PST
rocket science to figure out why that kind of story is so endearing to poor people. i mean, that's... that's... that's dinner and a show. >> narrator: behind the simple rustic imagery was the message of the coming kingdom of god, an enigma jesus did not attempt to simplify. >> jesus tells a parable about somebody who takes a mustard seed, plants it in the ground, and it grows up to be a great tree, or a bush at least-- a weed, though, in plain language. now, imagine an audience reacting to that. presumably the kingdom is like this, and they have to figure out, "what's it like? you mean, the kingdom is big? but you just said it's a big weed. so why don't you say a big cedar of lebanon? why a big weed? and besides, this mustard... we're not certain we like this mustard. it's very dangerous in our fields. we try to... we try to control it. we try to contain it. why do you mean the kingdom is something that the people try to control and contain?" every... every reaction in the audience... the audience fighting with themselves, as it were, answering back to jesus, is doing exactly wha
PBS
Dec 27, 2012 11:00pm PST
complex. it's a little science fiction. for a second food -- imagine for a second that food will not be a need, a physiological need. what is your relationship with food then? because we really need to think then eating and breathing is the only two things from the moment we're born until the moment we die. so really it's a very comple relationship. >> you can tell the world about the complexity behind eating. >> ( translated ): yeah, you know, the people that are watching us right now, you know we can be telling them about the backstage, what happened behind, but i am only interested in happiness. when you see a painting, it's the emotion. why is it become something emotional. and why you will feel very emotional when you are in front of a gastro no, ma'am cal experience. this is something like only one can tell himself. it's people that when they are in front of a picasso painting they cry. you saw the people that they walk by and without even looking and it's the same painting. >> rose: and that's the way you have to approach food that individually it has to touch you as
PBS
Dec 25, 2012 5:30pm PST
. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financialor literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations.ra and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation forr public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)